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Are Whole Eggs Healthy?

Don't Just Go For the Whites: 4 Reasons to Eat Whole Eggs

After a couple of decades of being considered not so good for you, eggs have definitely made a healthy comeback. If you skip the scrambled eggs breakfast because you're worried about the fat or cholesterol affecting your heart health, here are some reasons you shouldn't avoid eating whole eggs.

  1. One whole egg contains 185 milligrams of cholesterol (egg whites contain none). The daily recommended cholesterol limit is less than 300 milligrams for people with normal LDL (bad) cholesterol levels, so you can enjoy a whole egg each day, as long as you don't go overboard on other cholesterol-filled foods such as meat and dairy products.
  2. The white part of the egg may contain most of the protein, but the yolk contains most of the egg's nutrients. One yolk has 21.9 mg of calcium, 245 IU of vitamin A, 18 IU of vitamin D, 66.3 mg of phosphorus, and 24.8 mcg of folate.
  3. Having eggs for breakfast can help you lose weight. One egg is only 92 calories but offers 6.3 g of protein to give you sustained energy all morning long, so you're less likely to hit a midmorning slump and feel the need to reach for a not-so-healthy pick-me-up.
  4. Healthy fats are essential to our bodies and if you choose eggs fortified with omega-3 fatty acids, it's an easy way to increase your intake of these polyunsaturated fatty acids in your diet.

What do you eat more often: whole eggs or egg whites?

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